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FAQs: Offender Population

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CSOSA's Offender Population

  1. How many offenders and defendants are under CSOSA's supervision?
  2. Does CSOSA supervise juvenile offenders?
  3. I'm an offender and I need a job, what can CSOSA do to help me?
  4. I live in the community. I think that a CSOSA offender is causing trouble. Who do I talk to? What will happen? Can I find out if someone is on supervision?
  5. What services are available to people on supervision?
  6. What services can CSOSA provide to offenders no longer under supervision?
  7. Can I talk to my son's Community Supervision Officer? Will they tell me everything that is going on with him?
  8. What are the typical rules of supervision for CSOSA offenders?
  9. What happens if the offender violates these rules?
  10. Can you tell me who is an offender in my neighborhood?
  11. Where are offenders under CSOSA supervision confined prior to their release?
  12. Why do offenders have to come back to DC?
  13. How many CSOSA offenders have dependent children? How is CSOSA attempting to meet the needs of offenders with children?

How many offenders and defendants are under CSOSA's supervision?

On September 30, 2009, CSOSA monitored or supervised 16,101 offenders, including 9,725 probationers and 6,376 supervised releasees or parolees. Of this number, 7,108, or 44 percent, of these offenders were supervised at the highest risk levels and 5,048, or 31 percent, of these offenders were supervised as part of a specialized caseload (e.g., sex offender, mental health).
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Does CSOSA supervise juvenile offenders?

CSOSA does not supervise offenders charged as juveniles; this remains the responsibility of the DC Government. However, CSOSA does supervise offenders charged as adults, some of whom could be under the age of 18. During FY 2009, CSOSA supervised 61 offenders under the age of 18.
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I'm an offender and I need a job, what can CSOSA do to help me?

CSOSA's Vocational Opportunities, Training, Education and Employment Unit (VOTEE) provides assistance to offenders to develop a plan to improve educational functioning, find a job, and retain employment.

Community Supervision Officers refer unemployed offenders who have less than a high school education and/or documented learning disabilities to VOTEE for assessments to determine whether the offender is suited to educational services or vocational opportunities.

For more information on CSOSA's educational and vocational services see VOTEE Services.
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I live in the community. I think that a CSOSA offender is causing trouble. Who do I talk to? What will happen? Can I find out if someone is on supervision?

 

CSOSA maintains a team of Community Relations Specialists who are available to answer questions from members of the community. Community Relations Specialists are assigned responsibility for individual police districts. You may call 202-220-5320 to ask to speak with the Community Relations Specialist responsible for the police district in which you live.

 

Police District Community Relations Specialist Phone Number
1st District Michael Bonds (202) 220-5458
2nd District Elba Gonzalez (202) 220-5480
3rd District Luella Johnson (202) 220-5721
4th District Elba Gonzalez (202) 220-5480
5th District Alice Harper (202) 220-5317
6th District Lawrence Jordan (202) 220-5515
7th District Greg Thomas (202) 220-5318

 

Click here to determine your Police District or Police Service Area.

 

Community Relations Specialists will take the information that you provide, determine whether the person you are concerned about is supervised by CSOSA and, if so, pass that information that on to the offender's Community Supervision Officer. CSOSA policy prevents staff from disclosing offender information to members of the public.
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What services are available to people on supervision?

 

CSOSA maintains an array of treatment and support services. CSOSA assigns its limited services to offenders based on the intensity of the offender's need, his or her risk of continued criminal activity, and in response to judicial/parole commission orders.

 

In many areas of need, the District of Columbia government is the primary provider of services to residents of the District of Columbia. Offenders who are residents of the District of Columbia may be eligible for District provided substance abuse, employment, mental health and other services. A full list of DC government services is available online at 211 Answers, Please! or by dialing 211.
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What services can CSOSA provide to offenders no longer under supervision?

 

CSOSA only has the authority supervise individuals who are still under some form of sentence. CSOSA does make a range of information about resources available to individuals who are not on supervision. Please see the Reentry Resources listed in the Offender Reentry section [insert link to Reentry].

 

In addition, the District of Columbia government is the primary provider of services to residents of the District of Columbia. Offenders who are residents of the District of Columbia may be eligible for District provided substance abuse, employment, mental health and other services. A full list of DC government services is available online at 211 Answers, Please! or by dialing 211.
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Can I talk to my son's Community Supervision Officer? Will they tell me everything that is going on with him?

 

Yes, you may talk to your son's community supervision officer. CSOSA encourages positive family involvement in the lives of individuals it supervises. Federal and local privacy laws, however, protect information about an offender's substance abuse treatment, mental and physical health. CSOSA may not share this information with anyone without the express, written consent from the offender specifying with whom the information is to be shared, the reason for sharing the information and the time frame for which it can be shared. [Back]

What are the typical rules of supervision for CSOSA offenders?

 

General Conditions of Release for Probation are established by the Superior Court for the District of Columbia. See: Probation - General Conditions of Release.

General Conditions of Release for Parole are established by the United States Parole Commission. See: Parole - General Conditions of Release.
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What happens if the offender violates these rules?

 

Pursuant to 28 C.F.R. Part 810, CSOSA has, at its disposal, a range of sanctions to address offender noncompliance. The Schedule of Accountability through Graduated Sanctions attached below represents the sanctions currently deemed appropriate for effectively supervising CSOSA offenders. CSOSA reserves the right to modify the sanctions attached to the offender's Accountability Contract. Parolees are advised that they must accept the graduated sanctions attached to this Accountability Contract pursuant to the Conditions of Release contained in their parole certificate (28 C.F.R. §2.85(a)(15)). [Back]

Can you tell me who's an offender in my neighborhood?

CSOSA only releases the names of individuals on probation, parole, or supervised release to other law enforcement agencies.

If you have concerns that someone causing trouble in your neighborhood is on supervision, please contact one of CSOSA's Community Relations Specialists.

Community Relations Specialists will take the information that you provide, determine whether any individuals are supervised by CSOSA, and pass the information that you provide on to the offender's Community Supervision Officer. CSOSA policy prevents staff from disclosing offender information to members of the public. [Back]

Where are offenders under CSOSA supervision confined prior to their release?

The legislation that established CSOSA in 1997 also transferred the custody of offenders sentenced in D.C. Superior Court to the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). This transfer was completed, and the District's Lorton Correctional Complex closed, in 2000. Convicted misdemeanants with very short sentences or terms of split-sentence probation (a term of incarceration followed immediately by a term of supervised probation) are incarcerated by the DC Department of Corrections at the Central Detention Facility or the Correctional Treatment Facility (CTF). Sentenced felons and individuals whose release is revoked by the releasing authority (DC Superior Court or the United States Parole Commission) are placed in BOP facilities around the country.

As of July 31, 2008, 6,312 DC offenders were housed in BOP facilities in 34 states. The states with the highest population of DC offenders were Pennsylvania (1,119), West Virginia (922) and North Carolina (828). The BOP also operates Residential Reentry Centers, or halfway houses, in Washington, DC; less than half of the offenders returning to the District transition through these facilities prior to release. The map below illustrates the distribution of DC offenders throughout the country.

D.C. Offenders in Federal Prisons by State (as of July 2008)
Map of DC Offenders in Federal Prisons by State[Back]

Why do offenders have to come back to DC?

 

Nearly all offenders who return from incarceration to the community resided in Washington, DC prior to being sentenced. [Back]

How many CSOSA offenders have dependent children? How is CSOSA attempting to meet the needs of offenders with children?

A CSOSA review of offenders entering supervision in FY 2008 revealed that 63 percent had children and 56.6 percent had dependent children (age 18 or under). Twenty-one (21) percent of those offenders with dependent children are the primary caretakers of those children. Twenty-nine (29) percent of those with dependent children reside in the same household as their child(ren). Six and one-half (6.5) percent of those with dependent children have children who are involved with the juvenile justice system.

A limited number of CSOSA contract substance abuse treatment providers allow children (under age 11) to accompany offenders to residential drug treatment. The children are provided educational support (or are enrolled in school, if age appropriate), and receive primary health care screening and referrals. [Back]

 

Key Bridge crossing Potomac River, Washington, DC

Employment Information

As a Federal agency with a distinctly local mission, CSOSA employees perform challenging work that directly affects public safety in the District of Columbia's neighborhoods.