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FAQs: Supervision Staff and Offices

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CSOSA Supervision Staff and Offices

  1. How many Community Supervision Officers (CSOs) is CSOSA authorized to have?
  2. In previous budgets, CSOSA requested and Congress provided funding to allow CSOSA to reduce the number of offenders supervised by each Community Supervision Officer (CSO). What has been the effect of this additional funding on caseloads?
  3. Does CSOSA realign Community Supervision Officer (CSO) resources based on fluctuations in offender cases and types?
  4. How many community-based offender supervision offices does CSOSA have?

How many Community Supervision Officers (CSO) is CSOSA authorized to have?

CSOSA has 342 CSO positions in FY 2010 performing offender supervision, diagnostic and investigative functions. [Back]

In previous budgets, CSOSA requested and Congress provided funding to allow CSOSA to reduce the number of offenders supervised by each Community Supervision Officer (CSO). What has been the effect of this additional funding on caseloads?

Prior to the Revitalization Act, CSO caseloads averaged over 100 offenders, far in excess of the nationally recognized standards of the American Probation and Parole Association and best practices. As a result of increased funding, CSOSA has been able to increase the number of CSOs supervising high-risk general and specialized caseloads. This additional funding has resulted in closer monitoring and supervision of high-risk offenders and allowed staff to implement evidence-based practices.

Community Supervision Officer (CSO) Offender Caseloads
(Total Offenders Per Supervision CSO, by Case Type, as of September 30, 2009)

Offender Case Type Supervised Offenders Supervision CSOs Caseload Ratio
Special 5,048 119 42:1
General 5,699 131 44:1
Interstate 3,174 36 88:1
Sub-Total 13,921 286 49:1
Warrant 2,180 NA NA
TOTAL 16,101 286 56:1

[Back]

Does CSOSA realign Community Supervision Officer (CSO) resources based on fluctuations in offender cases and types?

Yes. CSOSA reviews detailed caseload information from its Supervision & Management Automated Records Tracking (SMART) case management system for changes in the number, type, and risk level of offenders supervised by CSOs. CSO resources are routinely realigned to meet these changes and ensure the close supervision of offenders. [Back]

How many community-based offender supervision offices does CSOSA have?

Immediately after the Revitalization Act, CSOSA had three small field offices for supervising offenders on Probation. Parole supervision was performed centrally in downtown offices. CSOSA currently has six community-based offender (Probation and Parole) supervision field offices throughout the District.

  1. 1230 Taylor Street, NW
  2. 910 Rhode Island Avenue, NE
  3. 1418 Good Hope Road, SE
  4. 3850 South Capitol Street, SE
  5. 25 K Street, NE
  6. 800 North Capitol Street, NW

In addition, CSOSA has specialized offender supervision operations co-located with the Metropolitan Police Department at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW, for highest-risk offenders (sex offenders, mental health, etc.) who cannot be supervised at neighborhood field offices. CSOSA operates on a year-to-year lease at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW, which is owned and operated by the DC Government. CSOSA also supervises high-risk offenders at its headquarters, located at 633 Indiana Avenue, NW.

CSOSA also operates the Re-Entry and Sanctions Center (RSC) at Karrick Hall on the grounds of the former DC General Hospital (1900 Massachusetts Ave SE). In addition, CSOSA operates vocational and educational programs at St. Luke's Church on 4923 East Capitol Street, SE, and at 4415 South Capitol Street, SW. CSOSA CSOs maintain an on-site presence at three Bureau of Prisons Residential Re-entry Centers (also known as halfway houses) within the District. [Back]

 

Key Bridge crossing Potomac River, Washington, DC

Employment Information

As a Federal agency with a distinctly local mission, CSOSA employees perform challenging work that directly affects public safety in the District of Columbia's neighborhoods.