Resources for:

Parole Supervision

Back to Supervision Types

Parole is a term of community-based supervision that occurs during a sentence of incarceration. Parole is a form of early release from prison based on an offender's positive adjustment to rehabilitative goals established during the incarceration portion of a sentence.

As a parolee, the convicted offender is placed under the control, supervision and care of a CSOSA Community Supervision Officer (CSO) in lieu of serving the remainder of his/her term of imprisonment, as long as his/her conduct complies with the conditions of release prescribed by the United States Parole Commission (USPC) and CSOSA.

The USPC issues certificates granting parole with or without special supervision conditions. Effective August 5, 2000, offenders convicted of D.C. Code felony offenses may be sentenced by the D. C. Superior Court judiciary to supervised release. Under this type of sentence, once the offender has served the required term of imprisonment, the Supervised Release certificate is subsequently issued by the USPC. The USPC may eventually revoke Supervised Release for any offenders who violate one or more of the conditions of release.

The USPC is responsible for oversight of four types of release:

  1. Supervised Release Certificate: This certificate is issued by the USPC and pertains to an offender who has served the full sentence imposed by the Court and is being released to the community following a probation revocation hearing, or a defendant not granted probation by the Court but who has served the Court-imposed sentence. Supervised Release is based on adherence to certain general conditions that are designed to protect the public welfare and ensure adequate supervision.
  2. Mandatory Release Certificate: This certificate is issued by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and pertains to an offender who has reached the short term or statutory release date while in the institution. The offender must adhere to a set of general conditions of release that are designed to protect the public welfare and ensure adequate supervision. If the offender is suspected of violating a condition of release, he or she will receive a parole revocation hearing to determine if supervision should be revoked and whether the violator should be returned to prison.
  3. Parole Certificate: This certificate is issued by the USPC when the offender is being released by the BOP to the community for supervision.
  4. Detainer Certificate: This certificate is issued by the USPC when the offender is obligated to another jurisdiction to serve incarceration time. The offender is paroled or released to the other state(s). If there are multiple detainers, the state that has the shortest full term date will receive the offender first. The inmate's CSOSA supervision case will be placed in monitored status while the detainers are being served.

 

Community Supervision Services

Employment Information

As a Federal agency with a distinctly local mission, CSOSA employees perform challenging work that directly affects public safety in the District of Columbia's neighborhoods.